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How to effectively engage your audience on Facebook

// May 24, 2010 // Social Media // 4 Comments

I’m an avid reader of Brian Solis’ blog because he makes things (especially social media analytics and metrics) easy to understand, he offers his insightful and well-rounded perspective and his profile picture makes me laugh. His May 10th blog post, “7 Scientific Ways to Promote Sharing on Facebook” included all of these characteristics and provided information that I believe should be taken into consideration when launching and creating content for a Facebook page. I’ve summed up his list of ways to engage your audience on Facebook, but his post is definitely worth taking a look at.

  1. The higher the share rates, the lower the reading grade level, with spikes at fifth and ninth grades. Translation: Don’t try to impress your reader with 25-cent words. They don’t want to look up words in a dictionary to figure out what you’re trying to say. Write in layman’s terms.
  2. In Facebook, titles with digits (1-9) outperform text only titles. Translation: Everyone likes a good list especially a short list that they can scroll through quickly.
  3. Facebook users seem most likely to share on Saturdays and Sundays. Translation: Get with it. Communication on social media channels isn’t just a Monday-Friday gig. Engage on the weekends (while you’re sitting on your couch, in your pj’s, watching “Space Balls” for the millionth time on TBS) and you might see an increase in content sharing.
  4. Experiential words such as “why,” “most,” “world,” and “how” trigger shares. The least shareable words include “review,” “poll,” and “social”. Translation: This one is easy. Use the first four words listed and not the last three.
  5. Adjectives and adverbs appear to be among the least shared parts-of-speech in Facebook as our attention spans are trained to look beyond promotion or hyperbole. Translation: Avoid sounding promotional. We’re already familiar with this cardinal rule, but there are many brands that still don’t get it.
  6. Negative updates are among the least shared while positive updates prove to be among the most shared. A special note: The word “sex” is at the top of the list for sharing. Maybe we should end all of our status updates with “sex” (i.e., I just had the best day with my husband (sex)!). Thoughts?

Do you have any Facebook sharing best practices? I’d love to hear them.

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    4 Comments

    1. Love this post, Erika! Another tip I often share with clients is keep your “shares” short. Too many words and your fans are likely to scroll right on past you in their news stream. Brevity is gold.
      .-= Callan´s last blog ..Five Tips for Great Presentations =-.

    2. Thanks Callan. You are the “goddess of social media”. Anyone who follows your suggestions is sure to be successful.

    3. This was great. Basically what I got from the post is keep it short and keep it spicy. Facebook is a known source for being more personal and definitely more fun. Since most users are viewing on the weekends give them something which at least differentiates from the typical corporate blah.

    4. I love your moto Kyle. “Keep it short and spicy.” I may have to adopt that myself. Thanks for the comment!